UNAIDS’ targets are for 90% of people with HIV to be diagnosed, 90% of diagnosed people to be taking treatment, and 90% of people on treatment to have an undetectable viral load. Achieving these targets will greatly reduce the spread of HIV.

Achieving the 90-90-90 target: latest news

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  • I Moved Back to Atlanta from Boston, and I've Been Out of HIV Meds for a Month

    HIV care is separate and unequal in America, health activist Mason writes, as "the system of care here feels no urgency around my survival."

    04 June 2019 | The Body
  • UNAIDS survey aligns with so-called fourth 90 for HIV/AIDS

    The survey echoes a trend in the community to take notice of mental wellness when thinking of public health interventions to fight HIV/AIDS.

    31 May 2019 | The Lancet (free registration required)
  • New Zealand: The tide turns on HIV

    The goal to virtually eliminate HIV transmission in NZ by 2025 suddenly looks attainable. Dr Peter Saxon explains why.

    17 May 2019 | Newsroom
  • Lesotho On Course to Control HIV

    Lesotho is making significant strides towards controlling the HIV epidemic and is on course to meet the global 90-90-90 targets by 2020.

    03 May 2019 | AllAfrica
  • What Can the United States Learn from Africa about HIV Epidemic Control?

    In a highly relevant new commentary just published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Wafaa M. El-Sadr, ICAP global director, with co-authors Kenneth H. Mayer, Miriam Rabkin, and Sally Hodder, explore the state of AIDS in America, the barriers that stand in the way of ending this persistent public health threat, and, compellingly, propose strategies and tactics that can be adopted from the progress made toward epidemic control in sub-Saharan Africa to bring HIV under control in the U.S.

    02 May 2019 | ICAP
  • HIV infection rates in New South Wales hit record low, but there are concerns

    The number of new HIV cases in NSW has dropped to their lowest level since 1984, but NSW Health would not say whether it will hit its target of "virtually" eliminating the disease by 2020.

    23 April 2019 | Sydney Morning Herald
  • US: 80% of new HIV cases transmitted by undiagnosed or untreated people

    In 2016, more than 80% of new HIV infections in the United States were transmitted by individuals who either did not know they were infected with HIV or had been diagnosed but were not receiving care, according to data released on the first day of the National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.

    19 March 2019 | Healio
  • South Africa: The problem of stopping or not starting HIV treatment

    South Africa has the largest HIV epidemic in the world. The United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimates that there are approximately 7.2-million South Africans living with HIV, with 270 000 new HIV infections in 2017. South Africa also has the largest antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme with more than four million people estimated to be on treatment. Despite progress in getting people onto treatment, recent evidence indicates that the country is still experiencing significant numbers of people developing and dying from advanced HIV-disease. This is as result of people who either do not start treatment, start treatment late, or stop and re-start treatment. There is, therefore, an urgent need to not only prioritise HIV-testing but to ensure that once people start treatment, they remain on life-long care.

    12 March 2019 | Spotlight
  • Wider ART Rollout Tied to Declines in HIV Mortality in Kenya

    Both all-cause mortality and mortality among HIV-positive people dropped in Western Kenya following a scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), a researcher said here. From 2011 to 2016, all-cause mortality dropped from 10.0 per 1,000 person years (95% CI 8.4-11.7) to 7.5 per 1,000 person years (95% CI 5.8-9.1), reported Emily C. Zielinski-Gutierrez, DrPH, of the CDC.

    12 March 2019 | MedPage Today
  • Largest ever HIV prevention study delivers sobering message

    The recipe for ending HIV epidemics seems straightforward. Introduce widespread testing. Immediately put those who test positive on antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, which suppress the virus to undetectable levels so those people won’t infect others. The number of new infections will drop, and the epidemic will peter out. But massive, costly studies done in the past few years have failed to show this strategy can reliably curb the spread of the virus, to the frustration of researchers.

    12 March 2019 | Science
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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