More and more people living with HIV are now older adults in their fifties, sixties or beyond. They often need to manage one or more other health conditions (called co-morbidities) alongside their HIV. Antiretroviral treatment works well for older people.

Ageing and HIV: latest news

Ageing and HIV resources

  • Lung cancer and HIV

    Smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. People living with HIV have a higher risk of lung cancer than the general...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • A long life with HIV

    This booklet provides information on living well with HIV as you get older. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and your health

    The outlook has never been better for people with HIV in the UK. With the right HIV treatment and care, most people can expect to have...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Life expectancy for people living with HIV

    With the right treatment and care, people with HIV can live a normal lifespan.People who have a good response to HIV treatment have excellent long-term prospects.You can...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Many side-effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug.Other medicines can be taken to help control side-effects.Possible side-effects should be taken...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and the ageing process

    It’s sometimes said that HIV speeds up the ageing process, but this is not certain.People with HIV are at greater risk of some health conditions, but not...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hepatitis B and HIV

    Hepatitis B is a blood-borne infection that is transmitted in some of the same ways as HIV.Hepatitis B can be prevented...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hepatitis C and HIV

    Hepatitis C is a blood-borne infection that is transmitted in some of the same ways as HIV.Over time untreated hepatitis C...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Dealing with multiple healthcare providers

    If you have several health conditions, you may find that health services are not as joined up as you’d like. There’s a lot you can do yourself...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Multiple medications and drug interactions

    The more drugs you take, the greater the risk of drug interactions and side-effects. It’s important to tell your doctors and pharmacists about all the other medicines you take. An...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Fatty liver disease and HIV

    Fatty liver disease occurs when fat builds up in liver cells. A healthy diet and exercise can reduce your risk of fatty liver disease. There are currently no good treatments...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pain

    Pain can cause emotional and mental health problems.Medication can be used in both the short and long term to control pain.Treating underlying medical problems may...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cancer and HIV

    Rates of some, but not all, cancers are higher in people living with HIV than other people.For many cancers, treatment works just as well for...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Anal cancer and HIV

    Rates of anal cancer are higher in people with HIV than other people.Most people who have abnormal cell changes in their anus do not go...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma and HIV

    Kaposi’s sarcoma remains one of the most common cancers in people living with HIV.HIV treatment protects against Kaposi’s sarcoma and slows down disease progression.People with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects checker

    A tool to help you talk to your healthcare team about any side-effects or symptoms that you have....

    From: Resources

  • Cognitive impairment and HIV

    Problems with thinking and memory can have a wide range of causes.A healthy lifestyle lowers the risk of cognitive impairment in later life.Cognitive impairment caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bone problems and HIV

    When your bones are thinner, a trip or fall can result in a broken bone. Exercise and other lifestyle changes are good for your bones. People aged 50+ and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Menopause and HIV

    The menopause is a natural part of each woman’s ageing process. Knowing what symptoms to expect during the menopause can help you deal with the experience. Hormone replacement therapy...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health monitoring in older age

    As we age, the risks of developing certain health problems increase. Some common conditions associated with being older (generally being over 50) include type 2 diabetes, heart disease...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Chronic kidney disease and HIV

    HIV may contribute to kidney disease but the two most common causes are diabetes and high blood pressure.Lifestyle changes can help keep kidney disease under control.Your HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Type 2 diabetes and HIV

    Changes to your lifestyle can reduce your risk of diabetes.Diabetes requires frequent monitoring and can have serious consequences if left untreated. Rates of diabetes are higher in people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Stroke and HIV

    A stroke is a medical emergency that requires prompt treatment. High blood pressure and raised cholesterol are risk factors for stroke. A healthy diet, regular exercise, stopping smoking, and other...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and HIV

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a cancer affecting the immune system. People with weakened immune systems, including people with HIV, are at increased risk of developing NHL. Most people with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their energy levels after starting HIV treatment.A healthy balanced diet may help...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • The heart

    Unhealthy lifestyles and untreated HIV contribute to heart attacks, diabetes, stroke and high blood pressure.Symptoms can include tiredness, breathlessness, an irregular heartbeat and chest pains.If anti-HIV drugs...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment, metabolic changes and ageing

    Smoking, lack of exercise, eating a lot of fatty foods and drinking a lot of alcohol can cause changes to blood fats and to the way your...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Conditions related to HIV treatment, metabolic changes and ageing

    Lipodystrophy is a condition which causes changes in body shape and involves fat loss or fat gain in certain parts of the body. Long-term use of some older anti-HIV...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cholesterol

    Excess cholesterol raises the risk of heart disease and stroke.Diet, exercise and smoking all have an impact on cholesterol levels.Some anti-HIV drugs may raise cholesterol levels....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • High blood pressure

    You should have your blood pressure monitored regularly as part of your HIV care.HIV drugs can interact with other medicines to affect blood pressure.Blood pressure...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2

Ageing and HIV features

Ageing and HIV in your own words

Ageing and HIV news from aidsmap

More news

Ageing and HIV news selected from other sources

  • As HIV patients live longer, heart disease might be their next challenge

    As people with HIV live longer, they also find themselves at higher risk for heart attack, stroke and other types of cardiovascular disease. A new American Heart Association report hopes to raise awareness about that connection, along with pointing out cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment strategies for an emerging population with unique concerns researchers have only begun to explore.

    04 June 2019 | American Heart Association
  • US: Planning for Retirement While Living With HIV

    Whether you're on public assistance or you're more well off, there are things you can do to plan for a secure future.

    03 June 2019 | The Body
  • Silver Singles: Why Are Sexually Transmitted Infections On The Rise In The Over 50s?

    Divorce, dating apps, and living longer means STIs are affecting more older people than ever before.

    03 June 2019 | Huffington Post
  • The forgotten generation?

    Modern advancements such as U=U have redefined what it means to live with HIV. But, as Ross Duffin reports, for the long-term survivors the lived reality is not so rosy.

    21 May 2019 | Positive Living
  • Raising the equality flag: Health inequalities among older LGBT people in the UK

    New analysis, based on data from 24 different surveys, demonstrates that the odds of lesbian, gay, or bisexual men and women experiencing poor self-rated health are around 1.2 times higher than for heterosexual people, with poor self-rated health being a strong predictor of future mortality.

    08 May 2019 | International Longevity Centre
  • Ageing with HIV: Testimonials of Stigma and Discrimination in Healthcare Settings

    So frequent were the stories that emerged of poor understanding and stigmatising attitudes to people with HIV from professionals working in medical services outside their HIV clinic, and so strong the fears of how people might be treated in these settings, that many participants with HIV reported a strong reluctance to access services which they needed for their ongoing good health, from surgery to dentistry and maternity services. These stories come from all parts of Europe.

    25 April 2019 | EATG
  • Effect of Depression, Lifestyle on Cognitive Function in PLWHIV

    Compared with patients without HIV, the poorer cognitive performances of PLWHIV were partly mediated by a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms.

    26 March 2019 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Experts tackle major cardiovascular issues in treating patients with HIV

    Since the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infection has become more like a chronic illness. Now that patients are able to live longer and remain free of developing AIDS, they have begun to encounter new risks from age-related disorders common in the general population, including cardiovascular disease (CVD).

    05 March 2019 | EurekAlert!
  • What are the treatment challenges for the over 50s in Africa?

    Although older adults in Uganda showed a high regard for the importance of anti-retroviral treatment, structural factors such as wait times and ageism still provide barriers to adherence.

    28 February 2019 | AVERT
  • Gilead Sciences Launches Age Positively Initiative to Address Unique Challenges of Aging Population Living with HIV

    Gilead Sciences, Inc. today announced it is providing $17.6 million in grants to 30 organizations in the United States through the Gilead HIV Age Positively initiative. This effort aims to enhance the lives of individuals aging with HIV by focusing in three priority areas: improving care coordination, increasing resources for better well-being, and educating and informing policies that impact people living and aging with HIV.

    27 February 2019 | Gilead press release
More news

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.